Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Russian > Needless for meaning

Needless for meaning

Site Logo

Academic and administrative texts are often characterized by verbiage—the use of more words than are needed to express an idea. Verbiage does nothing but hide the real message of the text under a load of needless words, frustrate and dispirit the reader, and weaken the credibility of the author. Verbiage is usually caused by two things: the use of needless words and the unnecessary repetition of parts of the meaning. The most notorious participant in verbose expressions is the word fact. It can nearly always be omitted. Sometimes, they are meaningful and hence cannot be eliminated, but often they are unnecessary for the understanding of the text.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: English Idiomatic Expression: Needless To Say

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Needless Meaning

needless - meaning in Gujarati

Site Logo

Last Australia Day, I was in Coles, shopping for something innocently patriotic such as grapes or Jatz crackers, when I stumbled upon merchandise altogether more risque.

Set high on a display stand was a pyramid of condom packets, in green and gold packaging, festooned with the Australian flag. I have never considered January 26 a particularly erotic holiday, but it's possible I lack imagination.

Patriotism drives people to do all sorts of crazy things, and on balance, it's preferable for Coles customers to make responsible love to each other, rather than riot or get Southern Cross tattoos. The fact that marketers have gotten their sticky fingers on our national day is alarming, however. Now Australia Day has a ''brand'', around which false needs can be created by advertisers.

We saw the same thing last week when retailers were forced, by much online clamouring, to withdraw from sale a T-shirt printed with the words ''Australia, est. The shame was not the silly claim that the T-shirt was racist.

It was that yet another public holiday is being commercialised beyond recognition. I am not quite sure what the Australia Day ''brand'' is, but apart from having nationalistic sex , it probably involves drinking beer, having a barbecue, enjoying cricket, or the beach, or beach cricket, wearing an Australia flag bikini, and venerating Australia's Gallipoli legacy - all of them noble pursuits. With the exception of the bikini - those things are unforgivable. Australia Day is largely peaceful, of course, but over the last decade it has taken on a boozy, jingoistic sheen, with young people literally wrapping themselves in flags, drinking and fighting in the name of the nation.

Musical festivals such as the Big Day Out, which used to be havens for pale and peaceful indie-music dorks, have become overtly macho. Alcohol bans are in place around much of Sydney's harbour and beaches, to protect picnicking families from drunks and boors - a uniquely Australian phenomenon, this alcohol ban, but you won't find anyone boasting about it in speeches on national pride.

This drink-soaked patriotism feels particularly yucky this year, given the public outcry about alcohol-related violence and the dark side of Australian masculinity. Sure, we may have a problem with a punching culture, but public drunkenness celebrating the arrival of the First Fleet at Sydney Cove? That's just Aussie lads being Aussie lads!

Now that Education Minister Christopher Pyne has raised in the political debate the holy cow of Gallipoli, things can only get tediously worse. Pyne claims there is not enough focus on Gallipoli in schools, and cites this as a primary reason for his review of the national curriculum - which, in itself, looks like a tactical distraction from the debate about school funding and the Gonski model.

This year is the centenary of the outbreak of World War I, which will be rightly commemorated in Europe and Australia, but we should also prepare ourselves for a tiresome public debate about the true meaning of the so-called Great War and how lefties hate Diggers and want to desecrate their legacy. You can already see the beginnings of it in some tabloids - culture wars over the wording on the tomb of the unknown soldier, attacks on former prime minister Paul Keating for daring to suggest World War I was an unjust war fought solely to protect imperial and colonial interests.

Sadly enough, just as we followed the British into Gallipoli, we are following them into this debate. A few weeks ago, British education secretary Michael Gove wrote a piece for Britain's Daily Mail lambasting the "left-wing myths" about the First World War that had been peddled by historians and TV programs, which portray the war as a "misbegotten shambles" and clear Germany of any blame.

Keating has famously said he will never visit Gallipoli. He doesn't know what he is missing - it is fascinating for any history-lover, and not at all sentimental. It is also hauntingly beautiful and full of crazy Turks who fall upon Australians with immediate friendship and offers of tea. When I visited, I realised that while I knew the history of the campaign as well as any other former Australian school student, I had no idea why Gallipoli was geographically significant, why the fighting took place there exactly, on this strange little peninsula in a country many Diggers probably couldn't have pointed to on a map before they were shipped there.

It was all about securing supply routes to Russia, of course. But there seemed something so random to it - the way all these Australian corpses ended up in this funny little spot - just as there is a randomness to being born Australian in the first place, instead of Norwegian or Chinese. On Australia Day, we should, by all means, celebrate our good fortune, the hiccup of fate that means we get to live in Australia rather than Somalia, whether we were born here or immigrated.

The fact that we are Australian is dumb luck, just as it is to be born beautiful or athletic. The only exceptions are immigrants who worked hard to get here. Jacqueline Maley is a senior journalist, columnist and former Canberra press gallery sketch writer for The Sydney Morning Herald.

Needless debate masks true meaning of Australia Day. The Sydney Morning Herald. But these are dangerous times to question any aspect of Australian-ness. Why talk about funding inequity when you can hide behind a generalised love of country? Gove has also rewritten the school history curriculum. Has Pyne been taking notes? But why would we be proud of that? Australian-ness is not an accomplishment in and of itself, but what we do with it can be. License this article. Jacqueline Maley Facebook Twitter Email.

English to Gujarati Meaning :: needless

To save this word, you'll need to log in. Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel , "As coronavirus spreads in Wisconsin, it's a time to connect with our values of resilience and compassion," 19 Mar. Send us feedback. See more words from the same century Dictionary Entries near needless needle scale needle scratch needle spike rush needless needlestick needletalk needle telegraph. Accessed 15 May.

Search for clues, synonyms, words, anagrams or if you already have some letters enter the letters here using a question mark or full-stop in place of any you don't know e. We've listed any clues from our database that match your search.

Mustafa Kassem death in custody was needless , tragic and avoidable, we send our sincere condolences to Mr. Kassem's wife and family at this painful time. The civil suit focuses on holding accountable the individuals who planned and participated in the reckless hazing activities which caused Tim's death, we expect this federal lawsuit to result in a trial to determine the shared responsibility of all those who contributed to the needless and senseless tragedy. We look to the civil justice system to obtain a full measure of accountability.

Needless debate masks true meaning of Australia Day

Last Australia Day, I was in Coles, shopping for something innocently patriotic such as grapes or Jatz crackers, when I stumbled upon merchandise altogether more risque. Set high on a display stand was a pyramid of condom packets, in green and gold packaging, festooned with the Australian flag. I have never considered January 26 a particularly erotic holiday, but it's possible I lack imagination. Patriotism drives people to do all sorts of crazy things, and on balance, it's preferable for Coles customers to make responsible love to each other, rather than riot or get Southern Cross tattoos. The fact that marketers have gotten their sticky fingers on our national day is alarming, however. Now Australia Day has a ''brand'', around which false needs can be created by advertisers. We saw the same thing last week when retailers were forced, by much online clamouring, to withdraw from sale a T-shirt printed with the words ''Australia, est. The shame was not the silly claim that the T-shirt was racist. It was that yet another public holiday is being commercialised beyond recognition. I am not quite sure what the Australia Day ''brand'' is, but apart from having nationalistic sex , it probably involves drinking beer, having a barbecue, enjoying cricket, or the beach, or beach cricket, wearing an Australia flag bikini, and venerating Australia's Gallipoli legacy - all of them noble pursuits.

Meaning of needless

His Oxford shirts and matching boxers are, needless to say, woven. Needless to say, Juxiao was thrilled to see them and gave each of them a lot of love and affection. Needless to say, this does not enamor her to the powers that be in Cameroon. Needless to say, Howie disagrees with that characterization.

Historically, surnames evolved as a way to sort people into groups - by occupation, place of origin, clan affiliation, patronage, parentage, adoption, and even physical characteristics like red hair. Many of the modern surnames in the dictionary can be traced back to Britain and Ireland.

Add needless to one of your lists below, or create a new one. Improve your vocabulary with English Vocabulary in Use from Cambridge. Learn the words you need to communicate with confidence.

English to Punjabi Meaning :: needless to say

Add needless to say to one of your lists below, or create a new one. Improve your vocabulary with English Vocabulary in Use from Cambridge. Learn the words you need to communicate with confidence.

.

NEEDLESS FUSS

.

Needless definition is - not needed: unnecessary. How to use needless in a sentence.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 0
  1. No comments yet.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.